The source for labor market and demographic information

Alphabetical Glossary of Terms And Acronyms

A · B · C · D · E · F · G · H · I · J · K · L · M · N · O · P · Q · R · S · T · U · V · W · X · Y · Z

A   [TOP]

  • Additional Initial Claim
    An additional unemployment claim filed after a break in unemployment claims, which results from an intervening employment period within the benefit year. (AZ/DES/DESS/RA/EA) (Acronyms defined in Glossary)
  • Average Annual Duration
    The number of weeks compensated (unemployment benefits) for the year divided by that year’s number of first payments. The average duration is the average number of weeks for which unemployment insurance claimants collect benefits under regular state programs. As the labor market weakens, the average duration increases and as the labor market strengthens, the average duration declines, making this an important analytical tool. (USDOL)
  • Average Benefits Per First Payment
    Unemployment benefits paid for all weeks compensated divided by the number of first payments. (USDOL)
  • Average Duration
    The number of weeks compensated (unemployment benefits) for the year divided by the number of first payments. (USDOL)
  • Average Weekly Benefit Amount (AWBA)
    Benefits Paid for Total Unemployment divided by Weeks Compensated for Total Unemployment. (USDOL)
  • Average Hourly Earnings/Average Weekly Hours
    The average total money earnings earned by production or non-supervisory workers for selected industries. The average number of hours worked by production or non-supervisory workers including overtime, paid vacation, and sick leave. The data is collected for the week including the 12th of the month.
  • AzCIS
    Arizona Career Information System. A computerized career information delivery system with Arizona data, produced in collaboration with the Arizona Career Resource Network (AzCRN) and IntoCareers, a research center at the University of Oregon College of Education. Available at no charge in schools, One Stops, and adult employment programs throughout the state of Arizona. http://www.azcis.intocareers.org/login_noip.a sp
  • AzCRN
    Arizona Career Resource Network. A state program funded by the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE) in the U.S. Department of Education to promote services and products that will improve career decision making among residents of the state of Arizona. http://acrnetwork.org/network.htm
  • Average Weekly Earnings
    Average Hourly Earnings multiplied by Average Weekly Hours.

B  [TOP]

  • BEA
    Bureau of Economic Analysis, United States Dept of Commerce
    1441 L Street NW
    Washington, DC 20230
    http://www.bea.gov/
  • BLS
    Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Dept of Labor
    Postal Square Building
    2 Massachusetts Ave., NE
    Washington, DC 20212-0001
    http://stats.bls.gov/
  • Benchmark (BMK)
    A point of reference from which measurement can be made. As used with Bureau of Labor Statistics data, information from a “better” source or period, which is used to adjust data obtained from another source or period.
  • Benefits Paid
    The Unemployment benefits paid to individuals under a state program, usually the first 26 weeks of benefits, for all weeks compensated including partial payments. (USDOL).

C  [TOP]

  • Continued Claims (CC, Also Known As Weeks Claimed)
    The number of weeks of unemployment benefits claimed, including weeks for which a waiting period or fixed disqualification period is being served. (USDOL) (AZDES/DESS/RA/EA)
  • Civilian Labor Force
    The labor force includes all persons classified as employed or unemployed and available for work in accordance with the definitions contained in this glossary.
  • Civilian Workers
    The National Compensation Survey defines Civilian Workers as the sum of all Private Industry and State and Local government workers. Federal Government, Military and agricultural workers are excluded.
  • Consumer Price Index (CPI)
    A national index measuring changes over time in the price of a fixed market basket of goods and services. There are two indexes—the All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) represents the buying habits of about 80 percent of the non-institutional population of the United States, and the Urban Wage & Clerical Workers (CPI-W) represents 40 percent of the population.
  •  Cost of Living
    A Cost of Living Index measures differences in the price of goods and services, and allows for substitutions to other items as prices change. A Consumer Price Index measures a price change for a constant market basket of goods and services from one period to the next within the same city (or in the Nation). The CPI is not a true cost of living index and should not be used for place to place comparisons.
  • Covered Employers
    Employers who are subject to state and federal Unemployment Insurance laws.
  • Covered Employment
    The number of employees covered by Unemployment Insurance reported to the states by employers. (ES 202) (USDOL)
  • The Covered Employment and Wages (CEW)
    Program publishes a quarterly count of employment and wages reported by employers covering 98 percent of U.S. jobs, available at the county, MSA, state and national levels by industry.
  • Current Employment Statistics (CES)
    A monthly survey of nonfarm business establishments used to collect wage and salary employment, workers hours, and payroll, by industry and area. Through the Federal/State cooperative effort, these data are used to compute current monthly employment, hours, and earning estimates, by industry, for the nation, the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and over 250 MSAs.
  • Current Population Survey (CPS)
    A monthly survey of households conducted by the Bureau of Census for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It provides a comprehensive body of data on the labor force, employment, unemployment, and persons not in the labor force.

D  [TOP]

  • Demographics
    The characteristics of the population such as age, income, ethnicity, etc
  • Discouraged Workers (Current Population Survey)
    Persons not in the labor force who want and are available for a job and who have looked for work sometime in the past 12 months (or since the end of their last job if they held one within the past 12 months), but who are not currently looking because they believe there are no jobs available or there are none for which they would qualify.
  • Displaced Workers
    Persons 20 years and over who lost or left jobs because their plant or company closed or moved, there was insufficient work for them to do, or their position or shift was abolished.
  • Disposable Personal Income
    Personal income less personal tax and nontax payments; the income available to persons for spending or saving.
  • Durable Goods
    Also known as “hard goods” because they include items manufactured or provided by wholesalers with a normal life expectancy of three years or more.

E  [TOP]

  • Employed Persons
    Persons 16 years and over in the civilian noninstitutional population who, during the reference week, (a) did any work at all (at least 1 hour) as paid employees, worked in their own business, profession, or on their own farm, or worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers in an enterprise operated by a member of the family, and (b) all those who were not working but who had jobs or businesses from which they were temporarily absent because of vacation, illness, bad weather, childcare problems, maternity or paternity leave, labor-management dispute, job training, or other family or personal reasons, whether or not they were paid for the time off or were seeking other jobs. Each employed person is counted only once, even if he or she holds more than one job. Excluded are persons whose only activity consisted of work around their own house (painting, repairing, or own home housework) or volunteer work for religious, charitable, and other organizations.
  • Employment Cost Index (ECI)
    Often referred to as total compensation cost (see Total Compensation in Glossary). The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) National Compensation Survey program publishes data on trends in employment costs, including quarterly and annual percent changes in labor cost (Employment Cost Index) and employer costs per hour worked for each component of compensation (Employer Cost for Employee Compensation). http://stats.bls.gov/news.release/eci.toc.htm
  • ES202 (Covered Employment and Wages)
    Now known as "Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW)." The Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program publishes a quarterly count of employment and wages reported by employers covering 98 percent of U.S. jobs, available at the county, MSA, state and national levels by industry.
  • ETA
    Employment and Training Administration (United States Department of Labor)
    Frances Perkins Building
    200 Constitution Avenue, NW
    Washington, DC 20210
    http://www.doleta.gov/
  • Exhaustions
    Number of claimants drawing the final payment of their original entitlement for a given program. (USDOL)
  • Exhaustion Rate
    A rate computed by dividing the average monthly exhaustions by the average monthly first payments. To allow for the normal flow of claimants through the program, the numerator lags the denominator by 26 weeks, e.g., the exhaustion rate for calendar year 1995, 3rd quarter, is computed by dividing the average monthly exhaustions for the twelve months ending September 1995, by the average monthly first payments for the twelve months ending March 1995. (USDOL)
  • Extended Benefits (EB)
    The supplemental program that pays extended compensation during periods of specified high unemployment in a state to individuals for weeks of unemployment after exhaustion of regular Unemployment Insurance benefits. One-half of EB (Extended Benefits) is funded by the state trust fund. (USDOL)

F  [TOP]

  • First Payments
    The first payment in a benefit year for a week of unemployment claimed under a specific program. This is used as a proxy for "beneficiaries" under a specific program. (USDOL)
  • Full-Time Employees
    Employees who usually work more than 35 hours per week (at all jobs within an establishment) regardless of the number of hours worked in the reference week.

G  [TOP]

  • Gross Domestic Product (GDP)
    The market value of goods and services produced by labor and property in the United States, regardless of nationality; GDP replaced GNP as the primary measure of U.S. production in 1991.
  • Gross National Product (GNP)
    The market value of goods and services produced by labor and property supplied by U.S. residents, regardless of where they are located.
  • GDP-By-Industry
    GDP-by-industry is the contribution of each private industry and government to the Nation's output (that is, the GDP.) An industry's GDP-by-industry, or its "value added," is equal to its gross output (which consists of sales or receipts and other operating income, commodity taxes, and inventory change) minus its intermediate inputs (which consist of energy, raw materials, semi finished goods, and services that are purchased from domestic industries or from foreign sources).
  • Gross State Product (GSP)
    A measurement of a State's output; it is the sum of gross state product originating (GSPO) from all industries in the State. GSP is the State counterpart of the Nation's GDP.

H  [TOP]



I  [TOP]

  • Implicit Price Deflator (IPD)
    The ratio of the current-dollar value of a series, such as GDP, to its corresponding chained-dollar value, multiplied by 100.
  • Industry
    A group of establishments that produce similar products or provide similar services. For example, Manufacturing, Construction, Health Care.
  • Initial Claim
    Any notice of unemployment filed by an unemployed worker to request (1) a determination of entitlement to and eligibility for compensation or (2) a second or subsequent period of unemployment within a benefit year or period of eligibility.
  • Interest Earned
    The amount of interest earned on the Unemployment Trust Fund account. (unpublished US Treasury reports)
  • Interstate Claims
    Unemployment Claims filed by a former state resident from a new state of residence.(AZDES/DESS/RA/EA)
  • Intrastate Claims
    Unemployment Claims filed by a current state resident for a period of unemployment which occurred while residing in another state. (AZDES/DESS/RA/EA)
  • Insured Unemployment Rate (IUR)
    The rate computed by dividing Insured Unemployed for the current quarter by Covered Employment for the first four of the last six completed quarters. (USDOL)

J  [TOP]



K  [TOP]



L  [TOP]

  • Labor Market Information (LMI)
    Labor Market can refer to the market for labor in a geographic area such as a metropolitan area, or the market for labor within an industry or industries; or the market for labor in specific occupations. The labor market can also refer to the availability of workers within a given area.
  • Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS)
    The LAUS program produces monthly and annual employment, unemployment, and labor force data for Census regions and divisions, states, counties, metropolitan areas, and many cities, by place of residence.

M  [TOP]

  • Marginally Attached Workers
    Individuals who want, and are available for work, and who have looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months (or since the end of their last job if they held one within the past 12 months), but were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the four weeks preceding the survey. Discouraged workers are a subset of the marginally attached. (See definition of Discouraged workers above.)
  • The Mass Layoff Statistics (MLS)
    Program collects reports on mass layoff actions that result in workers being separated from their jobs. Monthly mass layoff numbers are from establishments which have at least 50 initial claims for unemployment insurance (UI) filed against them during a 5-week period. Extended mass layoff numbers (released quarterly) are from a subset of such establishments--those where the employer indicates that 50 or more people were separated from their jobs for at least 31 days.
  • Mean wage
    An occupational mean wage estimate is calculated by summing the wages of all the employees in a given occupation and then dividing the total wages by the number of employees.
  • Median wage
    The boundary between the highest paid 50% and the lowest paid 50% of workers in that occupation. Half of the workers in a given occupation earn more than the median wage, and half the workers earn less than the median wage.
  • Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs)
    The general concept of an MSA is one of a large population nucleus, together with adjacent communities that have a high degree of economic and social integration with that nucleus. These are defined by the Office of Management and Budget as a standard for Federal agencies in the preparation and publication of statistics relating to metropolitan areas. There are five Metropolitan Statistical Areas in Arizona: Flagstaff, Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Prescott, Tucson, and Yuma.
  • Multiple Jobholders
    Employed persons who, during the reference week, either had two or more jobs as a wage and salary worker, were self-employed and also held a wage and salary job, or worked as an unpaid family worker and also held a wage and salary job. Excluded are self-employed persons with multiple businesses and persons with multiple jobs as unpaid family workers.
  • MVD
    Motor Vehicle Division of the Arizona Department of Transportation. Responsible for issuing driver's licenses and motor vehicle registrations.
    http://www.dot.state.az.us/MVD/mvd.htm

N  [TOP]

  • National Income and Product Accounts (NIPAs)
    BEA's economic accounts that display the value and composition of national output and the distribution of incomes generated in its production.
  • Nonfarm Wage & Salary Employment
    Persons on nonfarm establishment payrolls (including employees on paid sick leave, paid holiday, or paid vacation) who work or receive pay for any part of the week including the 12th of the month. It is a count of jobs by place of work. It does not include self-employed, unpaid volunteer or family workers, domestic workers in households, military personnel and persons who are laid off, on leave without pay, or on strike for the entire reference period.
  • North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)
    The successor to the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system (see below); this system of classifying business establishments is now being used by the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
  • Not in the Labor Force
    Includes persons 16 years and over in the civilian noninstitutional population who are neither employed nor unemployed in accordance with the definitions contained in this glossary.
  • Not Seasonally Adjusted
    This term is used to describe data series not subject to the seasonal adjustment process. In other words, the effects of regular, or seasonal, patterns have not been removed from these series.

O  [TOP]

  • Occupation
    A set of activities or tasks that employees are paid to perform. Employees that perform essentially the same tasks are in the same occupation, whether or not they are in the same industry. Some occupations are concentrated in a few particular industries, other occupations are found in the majority of industries.
  • The Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)
    Program produces employment and wage estimates for over 700 occupations. These are estimates of the number of people employed in certain occupations, and estimates of the wages paid to them. Self-employed persons are not included in the estimates. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual States, and for metropolitan areas; national occupational estimates for specific industries are also available.
  • One Stop Center
    One-Stop Centers are a single point-of-entry to a network of employment, training, and educational programs and providers in each community. They help workers and job seekers access the tools they need to manage their careers through high quality information and services and help employers find skilled workers. Information about job vacancies, career options, student financial aid, relevant employment trends, and instruction on how to conduct a job search, write a resume, or interview with an employer, is available to anyone in the United States. For One Stop locations in Arizona, visit http://www.de.state.az.us/oscc/location1.asp

P  [TOP]

  • Part-Time Employees
    Employees who usually work between 1 and 34 hours per week (at all jobs within an establishment) regardless of the number of hours worked in the reference week
  • Percentile Wage Estimate
    Shows what percentages of workers in an occupation earn less than a given wage and what percentages earn more. For example:
    • 25th percentile wage - A 25th percentile wage of $15.00 indicates that 25% of workers (in a given occupation in a given area) earn less than $15.00; therefore 75% of workers earn more than $15.00.
    • 75th percentile wage - A 75th percentile wage of $15.00 indicates that 75% of workers (in a given occupation in a given area) earn less than $15.00; therefore 25% of workers earn more than $15.00.
    • 90th percentile wage - A 90th percentile wage of $15.00 indicates that 90% of workers (in a given occupation in a given area) earn less than $15.00; therefore 10% of workers earn more than $15.00.
  • Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE)
    The goods and services purchased by the personal sector. In the NIPA's (National Income and Product Accounts), the personal sector consists of individuals (and nonprofit institutions serving them) residing in the United States.
  • Personal Income
    Income received by individuals from all sources. It is the sum of wages and salaries, other labor income, proprietors' income, rental income, dividend income, interest income, and transfer payments to persons-less personal contributions for social insurance.
  • Personal Outlays
    The sum of personal consumption expenditures, interest paid by consumers, and personal transfer payments to foreigners.
  • Personal Saving
    The difference between disposable personal income and personal outlays. The personal saving rate is personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income.
  • Preliminary Estimates
    Initial estimates for a particular month produced on a time schedule often requiring the utilization of a respondent sampling frame that is less than complete.
  • Producer Price Index (PPI)
    The Producer Price Index (PPI) measures the average change over time in the selling prices received by domestic producers for their output. The prices included in the PPI are from the first commercial transaction for many products and some services.

Q  [TOP]

  • QCEW -- Quartely Census of Employment and Wages
    The Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program publishes a quarterly count of employment and wages reported by employers covering 98 percent of U.S. jobs, available at the county, MSA, state and national levels by industry.

R  [TOP]

  • Recipiency Rate
    The percentage of unemployed covered by unemployment insurance. (USDOL/ETA)

S  [TOP]

  • Seasonal Adjustment
    Seasonal adjustment removes the effects of events that follow a more or less regular pattern each year. These adjustments make it easier to observe the cyclical and other non-seasonal movements in a data series.
  • Self-Employed Persons
    Include those who worked in their own business, profession, or on their own farm. Since 1967, published data exclude those who operate their own incorporated business or farm. Estimates for such workers are published separately.
  • Series Break
    An interruption in a time-series caused either by change in definition, or in methodology, etc. This makes it improper to compare data after the change with data from before the change.
  • Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) System
    The SIC system was used throughout the federal government to group establishments into industries. The SIC Division Structure collected and calculated establishment data by broad industrial divisions (labeled A through K), industrial groups (the 2-and 3-digit SIC levels), and specific industries (the 4-digit level). The SIC System has been replaced by NAICS, the North American Industry Classification System (see above).
  • Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system
    This system will be used by all Federal statistical agencies to classify workers into occupational categories for the purpose of collecting, calculating, or disseminating data. All workers are classified into one of over 820 occupations according to their occupational definition. To facilitate classification, occupations are combined to form 23 major groups, 96 minor groups, and 449 broad occupations. Each broad occupation includes detailed occupation(s) requiring similar job duties, skills, education, or experience.
  • State Revenue
    Funds deposited in state accounts in the Unemployment Trust Fund (UTF). These revenues are used to pay state Unemployment Insurance benefits and the state share of EB (Extended Benefits). (USDOL)
  • Subject Employers
    The total number of employers subject to Unemployment Insurance taxes. (ETA 581) (USDOL)

T  [TOP]

  • Tax Rate / Taxable Wages
    Total employer unemployment insurance tax contributions for a calendar year divided by the total taxable wages for the same period. (USDOL/ETA)
  • Tax Rate / Total Wages
    Total employer unemployment insurance tax contributions for a calendar year divided by the total wages for the same period. (USDOL/ETA)
  • Taxable Wages
    Wages paid to covered employees that are subject to State Unemployment Insurance taxes. (ES 202) (USDOL)
  • Taxable Wage Base
    For each State, the maximum amount of wages paid to an employee by an employer during a calendar year, which are subject to Unemployment Insurance taxes. Wages above this amount are not subject to tax. (USDOL/ETA)
  • Total Compensation (Employment Cost Index)
    All types of employee compensation: wages and salaries, non-wage cash payments and fringe benefits. Total compensation in the Employment Cost Index is defined as the employer's cost of wages and salaries and employee benefits.
  • Time Series
    A series of figures referring to different times, to show variation in magnitude of the particular item or items being measured. Definition of items measured must remain constant.
  • Trend
    The long term or overall movement of a series over time. Any economic time series is assumed to be made up of trend, irregular, cyclical, and seasonal movements.
  • Trust Fund Balance (TF)
    The balance in the individual state account in the Unemployment Trust Fund (see Unemployment Trust Fund definition in glossary entry below). (unpublished US Treasury reports)

U  [TOP]

  • Unemployed
    Those individuals, 16 years of age or older, who do not have a job but are available for work, except for temporary illness, and actively seeking work during the week including the 12th of the month. The only exceptions to these criteria are individuals who are waiting to be recalled from a layoff and individuals waiting to report to a new job within 30 days—these, too, are considered unemployed.
  • Unemployment Insurance (UI)
    Unemployment Insurance is a program for the accumulation of funds paid by employers, to be used for the payment of Unemployment Insurance benefits to workers during periods of unemployment, which are beyond their control.
  • Unemployment Trust Fund (UTF)
    A fund established in the Treasury of United States which contains all monies deposited by state agencies to the credit of their unemployment fund accounts and Federal unemployment taxes collected by the Internal Revenue Service. (USDOL)
  • Unemployment Rate
    The unemployment rate represents the number unemployed as a percent of the labor force.
  • USBLS
    United States Bureau of Labor Statistics
    Postal Square Building
    2 Massachusetts Ave., NE
    Washington, DC 20212-0001
    http://stats.bls.gov/
  • USDOL
    United States Department of Labor
    Frances Perkins Building
    200 Constitution Avenue, NW
    Washington, DC 20210
    http://www.dol.gov/
  • USDOL/ETA
    United States Department of Labor
    Employment & Training Administration
    Frances Perkins Building
    200 Constitution Avenue, NW
    Washington, DC 20210
    http://www.doleta.gov/

V  [TOP]



W  [TOP]

  • Wage and Salary Workers
    Workers who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payment in kind, or piece rates. The group includes employees in both the private and public sectors.
  • Weekly Benefit Amount
    The amount payable to a claimant for a compensable week of total unemployment.
  • Weeks Claimed
    The number of weeks that unemployed workers claimed Unemployment Insurance benefits.
  • Weeks Compensated
    The number of weeks for which compensation was actually paid.
  • Workforce Investment Act (WIA)
    Enacted by Congress in 1998, WIA requires states to streamline and consolidate their job training systems by creating a “one stop” approach to delivery of services. WIA not only replaces the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA), but also establishes a new workforce development system for the nation.

X   [TOP]



Y   [TOP]



Z  [TOP]